Home

About Us

Products

Calibration

Recalibration

Contact Us

Our A2LA Scope

Forms

FAQs

Help Topics

Sample reports

Request catalog

 

A MERCURY SEPARATION IN YOUR THERMOMETER?   RELAX!   THIS IS NOT A DEFECT!
(Instrucciones en Español abajo)

PLEASE UNDERSTAND - A separation of the mercury in your thermometer is not a defect!   It is a condition, normally caused by shock in transit, which of course must be rectified before using the thermometer, or you will experience significant errors in your readings.

PLEASE RESIST THE IMPULSE TO PUT THE THERMOMETER INTO DRY ICE OR TO HEAT IT! (YET) More often then not you will make the separation more difficult to rejoin, and you may damage the thermometer.  PLEASE READ THESE INSTRUCTIONS BEFORE ATTEMPTING TO REJOIN THE SEPARATIONS!

Most well constructed thermometers are filled above the mercury column with pressurized nitrogen gas (there are a few exceptions, which will not be considered here). The nitrogen serves many purposes: it is an inert gas, which minimizes the possibility of oxidation occurring inside the thermometer; the pressure is what makes the column retreat when the thermometer is removed from heat; and the pressurization is what permits the construction of thermometers for use above the boiling point of mercury (approximately 250C). The nitrogen gas is of course invisible. When you have a mercury separation in the capillary of the thermometer, the 'spaces' between the pieces of mercury are actually quantities of gas. In most cases it is virtually impossible to 'tap' the column back together - you cannot force the mercury through the gas in such a confined space, so don't bother trying - you may well break the thermometer. To be able to 'tap' the mercury back together, we must move the 'separations' into a larger chamber.

THE TRICK TO REMEMBER IS THAT WHILE THE MERCURY SEPARATIONS ARE IN THE CAPILLARY, THEY CANNOT BE EASILY REJOINED. WHEN WE MOVE THEM INTO A LARGER SPACE, THEY CAN BE EASILY MANIPULATED.

THIS IS EASY!

Firstly, determine the type of separation you have:

1. Separation(s) in a thermometer with a contraction chamber (Figure 1 below)
If your thermometer has a range that starts significantly above room temperature (for example, a range of 98 to 152C), the thermometer is constructed with an enlargement in the capillary between the bulb and the main scale. (See figure 1 below). This enlargement, or contraction chamber, is where the mercury normally resides at room temperature. This type of thermometer is extremely prone to mercury separations, especially during shipment. Fortunately, the separations are usually very easy to rejoin.

Firstly, determine how the separation(s) appear. If all the mercury appears to be within the chamber (figure 1), the thermometer may be tapped gently (vertically) onto a padded surface until the separated portion falls and rejoins with the mercury in the lower portion of the chamber.

ONCE AGAIN - THE TRICK TO REMEMBER IS THAT WHILE THE MERCURY SEPARATIONS ARE IN THE CAPILLARY, THEY CANNOT BE EASILY REJOINED. WHEN WE MOVE THEM INTO A LARGER SPACE, THEY CAN BE EASILY MANIPULATED.

If the separated mercury is lodged in the upper portion of the chamber, and/or is located in the column above the chamber (figure 1a), it will be necessary to bring the separation down into the chamber so that it may be tapped as described above. Cool the thermometer bulb a little at a time (dip it into a mixture of ice and water) until the mercury retreats into the chamber. While it is lying in the chamber, tap as described above to rejoin the separation.

If the separation is located in the lower portion of the chamber, or in the capillary below the chamber (figure 1b), we must do the REVERSE of the above. Warm the bulb (try hot tap water first) a bit at a time until the separation is located in the chamber. When the separation is in the chamber, tap as described above to drive the separated mercury down (actually, we are forcing the gas up).

Sometimes with severely separated thermometers it is necessary to rejoin the separation(s) in stages. Just remember that it is necessary to move the separation into the chamber to be able to rejoin it.

2. Separations in the column (thermometers without contraction chambers). See figure 2
This type of separation is less common, and a little trickier to rejoin. There are basically two methods:

COOLING METHOD (preferred)
Obtain a small quantity of dry ice or other source of extreme cold. Immerse the thermometer BULB ONLY (TAKE CARE NOT TO IMMERSE THE ENTIRE BULB OR ANY PORTION OF THE STEM) halfway into the dry ice and observe the descending mercury column carefully. The main column will disappear into the bulb, followed by the separated pieces of mercury. Wait a few seconds more, and then withdraw the thermometer from the dry ice and gently and carefully tap it onto a padded surface. The tapping will permit the separated pieces of mercury to fall and rejoin the main mass of mercury now within the bulb. Allow the thermometer to warm naturally (do not heat it) in a vertical position, and observe the mercury column as it ascends into the capillary to be certain it is intact.

HEATING METHOD CAUTION: DO NOT ATTEMPT THIS METHOD WITH THERMOMETERS WHOSE RANGE EXTENDS ABOVE 150C OR DAMAGE MAY RESULT. Most well constructed thermometers have a small chamber at the extreme top of the capillary, called an expansion chamber. The purpose of this chamber is to provide over-range protection in case the thermometer is heated beyond its scale range. This chamber may be used to rejoin separations provided 1) the amount of separated mercury is very small (not more than a few scale divisions in length) and 2) the thermometer's range does not exceed 150C. The thermometer may be heated (in hot water, hot oil or other suitable medium compatible with the temperatures to be attained) so that the separation(s) enter the expansion chamber followed by a small portion of the main (intact) column. GREAT CARE MUST BE EXERCISED TO NOT FILL THE EXPANSION CHAMBER MORE THAN HALFWAY, OR BREAKAGE OF THE BULB (AND SPILLAGE OF THE MERCURY) MAY OCCUR) The separations will normally fall to the side of the expansion chamber, and the main column will come into contact with them. Remove the thermometer from the heat, maintain it in a vertical position, and observe the mercury column as it retreats to be sure it is intact.

3. Separations in the expansion chamber Figure 3 below.  
Some thermometers are designed with very low ranges (for example, ASTM 62C, a common certified reference thermometer, has a range of -38 to +2C) such that the mercury at room temperature resides in an oversized expansion chamber at the extreme top of the instrument. (figure 3) Again, often in shipment, this mercury can become separated.

Normally the separation is visually apparent, and can be rejoined quickly and easily by simply tapping, however, if you see a separation in the column, the thermometer must be heated (warm water) until the separation (gas) enters the expansion chamber, where it can be rejoined by tapping. Again - THE TRICK TO REMEMBER IS THAT WHILE THE MERCURY SEPARATIONS ARE IN THE CAPILLARY, THEY CANNOT BE EASILY REJOINED. WHEN WE MOVE THEM INTO A LARGER SPACE, THEY CAN BE EASILY MANIPULATED.

AFTER REJOINING MERCURY SEPARATIONS, IT IS HIGHLY RECOMMENDED THAT THE THERMOMETER BE VERIFIED IN A KNOWN TEMPERATURE PRIOR TO BEING PLACED INTO USE. IF THE THERMOMETER READS CORRECTLY AT THIS KNOWN TEMPERATURE, IT MAY BE SAFELY ASSUMED THAT THE SEPARATION HAS BEEN CORRECTLY REJOINED.

IF THE THERMOMETER'S INDICATION AT A KNOWN TEMPERATURE IS HIGH, THERE IS GAS (A SEPARATION) EITHER IN THE BULB OR THE COLUMN WHICH IS DISPLACING MERCURY AND CAUSING A FALSELY HIGH READING. GO BACK AND FIND THE SEPARATION AND REMOVE IT.

IF THE THERMOMETER'S INDICATION AT A KNOWN TEMPERATURE IS LOW, IT MAY BE ASSUMED THAT THERE IS A MERCURY SEPARATION SOMEWHERE ABOVE THE COLUMN (LOOK FOR IT IN THE UPPER REACHES OF THE COLUMN OR IN THE EXPANSION CHAMBER).

IF ALL ELSE FAILS, CALL ICL CALIBRATION AT 772 286 7710 AND WE WILL WALK YOU THROUGH THE PROCEDURES.

TYPICAL MERCURY SEPARATIONS IN THERMOMETERS

Fig. 1 (below) Separation of mercury in the contraction chamber

sep_fig_1.JPG (19914 bytes)

Fig. 1a (below) Mercury is separated in chamber but is also lodged in upper part of chamber and in capillary

sep_fig_2.JPG (20203 bytes)

Fig. 1b (below) The mercury is separated in the chamber and also in the capillary below the chamber

sep_fig_3.JPG (20511 bytes)

Fig. 2 (below) Separations in the upper part of the mercury column

Sep_fig_4.JPG (18514 bytes)

Fig. 3 (below) Separations in the expansion chamber

Sep_fig_5.JPG (18041 bytes)

Back to ICL's home page

INSTRUCCIONES PARA REUNIR SEPARACIONES DEL MERCURIO EN TERMÓMETROS

¡FAVOR de ENTENDER!- Una separación del mercurio en su termómetro no es un defecto! Es una condición, normalmente causada por el maltrato a las cajas con los termómetros durante el transporto de las mismas, que por supuesto se debe rectificar antes de utilizar el termómetro, o va a tener errores significativos en sus lecturas.

¡Favor de no poner el termómetro en hielo seco! Espere! El resultado en la mayoría de los casos es que terminaría haciendo mas difícil la reunión del mercurio y en otros hasta podría dañar el termómetro. FAVOR DE LEER ESTAS INSTRUCCIONES ANTES DE EMPEZAR A REUNIR LAS SEPARACIONES!

Durante la fabricación del termómetro, se llena sobre la columna del mercurio con gas del nitrógeno presurizado (hay unas excepciones, que no se considerarán aquí). El nitrógeno sirve muchos propósitos: es un gas inerte, que minimiza la posibilidad de oxidación que ocurre dentro del termómetro; esta presión es lo que empuja la columna cuando se retira el termómetro del calor; y esta presión es lo que permite la construcción de termómetros para uso sobre el punto de ebullición de mercurio (aproximadamente 250C) El gas del nitrógeno es por supuesto invisible. Cuando se tiene una separación del mercurio en el capilar de el termómetro, los espacios entre los pedazos de mercurio son realmente cantidades de gas. En la mayoría de casos está casi imposible a hacerle retroceder junto a la columna - no se puede forzar el mercurio por el gas en tan confinado. No trate de hacer la prueba - rompería el termómetro. Para poder reunir las separaciones, debemos mover las separaciones en una cámara más grande.

Mientras las separaciones del mercurio estén en el capilar, es casi imposible reunirlas. Cuando hayan sido movidas a una cámara mas grande, se puede manipularlas fácilmente.

¡Esto es fácil!

Primeramente, determina el tipo de separación que tiene:

1. Separación (es) en un termómetro con una cámara de la contracción.

Si su termómetro tiene una escala que comienza significativamente sobre la temperatura ambiental (por ejemplo, un rango de 98 a 152C), se construye el termómetro con un agrandamiento en el capilar entre el bulbo y la escala principal. (Vea figura 1 abajo). Este agrandamiento, o cámara de contracción, está donde el mercurio normalmente permanece a temperatura ambiente. Este tipo de termómetro tiene tendencia llegar con separaciones del mercurio. Afortunadamente, estas separaciones normalmente son muy fáciles para reunir.

Primeramente, determina cómo la separación (es) aparece. Si todo el mercurio parece estar dentro de la cámara (figura 1), se dan palmaditas al termómetro suavemente en una posición vertical hacia una superficie rellena hasta que la porción separada se cae y se reúne con el mercurio en la más baja porción de la cámara.

Una vez mas - Acuérdese que mientras las separaciones del mercurio estén en el capilar, es casi imposible reunirlas. Cuando han sido movidas a una cámara mas grande, se puede manipularlas fácilmente.

Si se aloja el mercurio separado en la porción superior de la cámara, y/ o se localiza en la columna sobre la cámara (figura 1a), será necesario atraer la separación a la parte baja en la cámara de la manera descrita en el párrafo anterior. Meta el bulbo del termómetro poco a poco en una mezcla de hielo y agua hasta que las separaciones del mercurio se retiran en la cámara. Mientras quedan en la cámara, dele palmaditas como es describió sobre reunir la separación.

Si se localiza la separación en la más baja porción de la cámara, o en el capilar abajo la cámara (figura 1b), debemos subir la temperatura un poco. Hay que calentar el bulbo lentamente hasta que se localiza la separación en la cámara. Cuando la separación está en la cámara, dele palmaditas como describió arriba hasta que el mercurio separado baja (realmente, forzamos el gas arriba).

A veces, con termómetros severamente separados, será necesario reunir las separaciones en fases. Sólo recuerda que es necesario mover la separación en la cámara para poder reunirla.

2. Separaciones en la columna (termómetros sin cámaras de contracción). Vea figura 2

Este tipo de separación es menos común, y un poco mas difícil para arreglar. Hay básicamente dos métodos:

MÉTODO UNO (preferido)

Obtenga una cantidad pequeña de hielo seco o otro fuente de frío extremo. Sumerja el BULBO del termómetro SOLAMENTE A LA MITAD (TENGA CUIDADO EN NO SUMERGIR EL BULBO TOTALMENTE EN EL HIELO SECO NI TAMPOCO CUALQUIER PORCIÓN DEL TALLO) en el hielo seco y observa la columna del mercurio descendente cuidadosamente. La columna principal desaparecerá en el bulbo, seguido por los pedazos separados de mercurio. Espere unos segundos más, y entonces retire el termómetro del hielo seco y suave y cuidadosamente dele palmaditas hacia la superficie rellena. Dándole palmaditas permitirá que los pedazos separados de mercurio se caigan y se reúnen con la masa principal de mercurio ahora dentro del bulbo. Deje el termómetro calentar naturalmente (no lo caliente) en una posición vertical, y observe la columna del mercurio cuando asciende en el capilar para estar seguro que ya está sin separaciones.

MÉTODO CALORIFICO: AVISO: NO SE DEBE UTILIZAR ESTE MÉTODO CON TERMÓMETROS CON ESCALAS QUE LLEGAN SOBRE 200C SE PODRÍA DAÑAR AL TERMÓMETRO. Casi todos los termómetros son construidos con una cámara pequeña en la cima extrema del capilar, que se llama la cámara de expansión. El propósito de ésta cámara es proporcionar protección de sobretemperatura en caso de que se caliente el termómetro más allá de su rango en la escala. También se usan esta cámara para reunir separaciones del mercurio, si:

1) la cantidad de mercurio separado es muy pequeña (la longitud sola exceda unas divisiones de la escala) y

2) el rango del termómetro no exceda 200C.

Se puede calentar el termómetro (en agua caliente, aceite caliente o otro medio satisfactorio compatible con las temperaturas se logra) hasta que la separación (es) entre la cámara de expansión seguido por una porción pequeña del principal (intacta) columna. SE DEBE EJERCER GRAN CUIDADO EN NO LLENAR LA CÁMARA DE EXPANSIÓN MAS QUE HASTA LA MITAD O SE PUEDE ROMPER EL BULBO Las separaciones se caerán normalmente al lado de la cámara de expansión, y la columna principal se podría en contacto con ellos. Quite el termómetro del calor, manténgalo en una posición vertical, y observe la columna del mercurio cuando se retira para estar seguro que está intacta.

3. Separaciones en la cámara de expansión. Se diseñan unos termómetros con muy bajos rangos (por ejemplo, ASTM 62C, un patrón común, tiene un rango de- 38 a +2C) tal que el mercurio a la temperatura ambiente esta situado en al cámara de expansión localizada a la cima extrema del instrumento. (Vea figura 3) De nuevo, a menudo por los causas mencionados durante el transporto, este mercurio puede separarse. Normalmente la separación es fácilmente observable, y se puede arreglarla fácilmente por medio de palmaditas. Sin embargo, si ve una separación en la columna, se debe calentar el termómetro (agua caliente) hasta que la separación (gas) entre la cámara de expansión, donde se puede reunirse por darle palmaditas. De nuevo- Acuérdese que mientras las separaciones del mercurio estén en el capilar, es casi imposible reunirlas. Cuando han sido movidas a una cámara mas grande, se puede manipularlas fácilmente.

DESPUÉS DE HABER REUNIDO LAS SEPARACIONES DEL MERCURIO, SE SUGIERE QUE SE VERIFIQUE EL TERMÓMETRO CON UNA TEMPERATURA CONOCIDA A VER SI INDICA BIEN LA TEMPERATURA. SI EL TERMÓMETRO LEE CORRECTAMENTE EN ESTA TEMPERATURA CONOCIDA, SE PUEDE ASUMIR CON SEGURIDAD QUE TODOS LAS SEPARACIONES HAN SIDO REUNIDAS Y EL INSTRUMENTO FUNCIONARA BIEN.

CUANDO EL TERMÓMETRO NO INDICA LA TEMPERATURA CORRECTAMENTE, LE QUEDAN SEPARACIONES. SI LA INDICACIÓN DEL TERMÓMETRO ES ALTA, HAY GAS EN EL BULBO O EN UNA DE LAS CÁMARAS. ESTE GAS CONSUME ESPACIO, Y HACE LEER ALTO EL TERMÓMETRO. BUSQUE ESTE GAS Y QUÍTELO SEGÚN LAS INSTRUCCIONES DE ARRIBA..

SI LA INDICACIÓN DEL TERMÓMETRO COMPARADO CON UNA TEMPERATURA CONOCIDA ES BAJA, SE ASUME QUE HAY UNA SEPARACIÓN DEL MERCURIO EN ALGUNA PARTE SOBRE LA COLUMNA (SE BUSCA EN LOS PARTES SUPERIORES - LA COLUMNA O EN LA CÁMARA DE EXPANSIÓN).

SI NO TE QUEDA OTRO REMEDIO, LLÁMENOS A 772 286 7710 Y LE AYUDAMOS POR TELÉFONO CON LA SEPARACIÓN.

ICL CALIBRATION LABORATORIES, INC.
1501 Decker Ave Suite 118 Stuart, FL 34994 USA
Tel: 772 286 7710 Facsímil: 772 286 8737

correo electronico jeff@icllabs.com

Especialistas en la calibración de termómetros e hidrómetros

 

    

ICL Calibration Laboratories, Inc.

1501 Decker Avenue, Suite 118, Stuart, Florida 34994  USA

   Home             Contact us